DPI Scaling on Linux Mint

I have a Surface Pro 2 which has a relatively dense, 10-inch 1080p screen. It hurts my eyes to look at individual UI elements and text without dpi scaling. On Windows, everything is scaled up by 150% by default.

I wanted to use Linux Mint on VirtualBox for development but I couldn't find any articles on the internet on how to get the elements to scale up properly. After some trial-and-error, this is how I achieved 150% dpi scaling that is good enough.

  1. Go to Preference -> General, then select User interface scaling to be Double. This doubles everything in size. This works for other high density displays like MacBook Pro retina but many things looked too big for the screen of Surface Pro 2.
  2. Go to Preference -> Fonts, then set text scaling factor to 0.7. This leaves UI elements to be double the size but makes text smaller. Since the text size was doubled then multiplied by 0.7, it ends up being 140% of the original size, which is close enough to the desired level of 150%.
  3. Log out and back in to finish applying the change.
 

Catergorized under: techtips / linux

Published: 2014-06-30T03:27:00.000
Last modified: 2015-09-04T02:01:53.786501
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Transferring installed programs on OpenSUSE 12.1 (or, trying to enlarge the root partition)

I am using OpenSUSE 12.1 in VirtualBox. After installing a bunch of programs I needed, it started complaining that there is not enough space in root partition. After a while, it got to the point where I couldn’t even install security updates. I have installed OpenSUSE on the default hard disk size of 8GB, with the default root partition size of 5GB but clearly that was not enough.

Unfortunately the root partition was laid out between the boot partition and the home partition. So I decided to try to take a shortcut by mounting a new harddisk, use dd to copy the content of the partitions, and use resize2fs to enlarge the new root partition on the new hard drive. HUGE mistake! I completely forgot modern Linux installations use fstab with UUID entries. The bottom line is that I couldn’t get OpenSUSE to boot up at all.

Hence, I took a longer way of re-intalling and transferring my configurations. I haved used the following command to extract the names of all the packages installed on my OpenSUSE installation.

zypper se -i | tail +6 | awk '{ print $3 }' > packages.txt

Installing a new OpenSUSE instance took about 10 minutes on my desktop (i5-2500k). I just copied over the file to the new instance and issued the following command to restore all the installed packages.

zypper install `cat packages.txt`

Another note on using OpenSUSE on VirtualBox is that you should uninstall the built-in VirtualBox guest addition and re-install a newer version of VirtualBox guest edition.

zypper remove virtualbox-guest-x11 virtualbox-guest-tools virtualbox-guest-kmp-default

Catergorized under: techtips / linux

Published: 2012-01-30T15:00:00.000
Last modified: 2015-08-31T04:02:20.659301
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